classic poetry

Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night

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This week’s Poetry Tuesday selection is Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night by Dylan Thomas. I have heard several interpretations of this poem. To me this poem is about fighting a good fight and never giving up, but also making every moment of life count. What does it mean to you? I hope you enjoy it. Be Blessed my friends.

 

 

Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night

Do not go gentle into that good night,
Old age should burn and rave at close of day;
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

Though wise men at their end know dark is right,
Because their words had forked no lightning they
Do not go gentle into that good night.

Good men, the last wave by, crying how bright
Their frail deeds might have danced in a green bay,
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

Wild men who caught and sang the sun in flight,
And learn, too late, they grieved it on its way,
Do not go gentle into that good night.

Grave men, near death, who see with blinding sight
Blind eyes could blaze like meteors and be gay,
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

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If I Can Stop One Heart From Breaking

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This week’s Poetry Tuesday’s feature is If I Can Stop One Heart From Breaking by Emily Dickinson. I really love the concept of the poem. Enjoy and be blessed my friends!

If I Can Stop One Heart From Breaking

If I can stop one heart from breaking,
I shall not live in vain;
If I can ease one life the aching,
Or cool one pain,
Or help one fainting robin
Unto his nest again,
I shall not live in vain.

The Road Not Taken

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The Road Not Taken has always been one of my favorite poems. I have often thought about the roads we choose in life and how we can never go back and choose the other. Life is truly a journey.

The Road Not Taken

Two roads diverged in a yellow wood,
And sorry I could not travel both
And be one traveler, long I stood
And looked down one as far as I could
To where it bent in the undergrowth;

Then took the other, as just as fair,
And having perhaps the better claim
Because it was grassy and wanted wear,
Though as for that the passing there
Had worn them really about the same,

And both that morning equally lay
In leaves no step had trodden black.
Oh, I kept the first for another day!
Yet knowing how way leads on to way
I doubted if I should ever come back.

I shall be telling this with a sigh
Somewhere ages and ages hence:
Two roads diverged in a wood, and I,
I took the one less traveled by,
And that has made all the difference.

Robert Frost